(Source: invaderxan)

Hubble ACS SWEEPS field.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, W. Clarkson (Indiana University and UCLA) and K. Sahu (STScI)

nationalgeographicmagazine:

Star Fields Photograph courtesy Tunç Tezel, APOY/Royal Observatory
This image of the Milky Way’s vast star fields hanging over a valley of human-made light was recognized in the 2012 Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition run by the U.K.’s Royal Observatory Greenwich.
To get the shot, photographer Tunç Tezel trekked to Uludag National Park near his hometown of Bursa, Turkey. He intended to watch the moon and evening planets, then take in the Perseids meteor shower.
“We live in a spiral arm of the Milky Way, so when we gaze through the thickness of our galaxy, we see it as a band of dense star fields encircling the sky,” said Marek Kukula, the Royal Observatory’s public astronomer and a contest judge.
Full story»

nationalgeographicmagazine:

Star Fields
Photograph courtesy Tunç Tezel, APOY/Royal Observatory

This image of the Milky Way’s vast star fields hanging over a valley of human-made light was recognized in the 2012 Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition run by the U.K.’s Royal Observatory Greenwich.

To get the shot, photographer Tunç Tezel trekked to Uludag National Park near his hometown of Bursa, Turkey. He intended to watch the moon and evening planets, then take in the Perseids meteor shower.

“We live in a spiral arm of the Milky Way, so when we gaze through the thickness of our galaxy, we see it as a band of dense star fields encircling the sky,” said Marek Kukula, the Royal Observatory’s public astronomer and a contest judge.

Full story»

nationalgeographicmagazine:

Star Fields Photograph courtesy Tunç Tezel, APOY/Royal Observatory
This image of the Milky Way’s vast star fields hanging over a valley of human-made light was recognized in the 2012 Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition run by the U.K.’s Royal Observatory Greenwich.
To get the shot, photographer Tunç Tezel trekked to Uludag National Park near his hometown of Bursa, Turkey. He intended to watch the moon and evening planets, then take in the Perseids meteor shower.
“We live in a spiral arm of the Milky Way, so when we gaze through the thickness of our galaxy, we see it as a band of dense star fields encircling the sky,” said Marek Kukula, the Royal Observatory’s public astronomer and a contest judge.
Full story»

nationalgeographicmagazine:

Star Fields
Photograph courtesy Tunç Tezel, APOY/Royal Observatory

This image of the Milky Way’s vast star fields hanging over a valley of human-made light was recognized in the 2012 Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition run by the U.K.’s Royal Observatory Greenwich.

To get the shot, photographer Tunç Tezel trekked to Uludag National Park near his hometown of Bursa, Turkey. He intended to watch the moon and evening planets, then take in the Perseids meteor shower.

“We live in a spiral arm of the Milky Way, so when we gaze through the thickness of our galaxy, we see it as a band of dense star fields encircling the sky,” said Marek Kukula, the Royal Observatory’s public astronomer and a contest judge.

Full story»

discoverynews:

rhamphotheca:

The Sun on Christmas (12/25/12)
We still are seeing a quiet Sun. Even though the active region in the center of the Sun harbors the energy for a M-class (Medium) sized solar flare, we have only tracked B and C-class flares. These are much smaller in size and provide barely noticeable effects.  Wishing you all a safe celebration today!  (Credit: NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory)

Super-hot Christmas hugs from our nearest star.

discoverynews:

rhamphotheca:

The Sun on Christmas (12/25/12)

We still are seeing a quiet Sun. Even though the active region in the center of the Sun harbors the energy for a M-class (Medium) sized solar flare, we have only tracked B and C-class flares. These are much smaller in size and provide barely noticeable effects.

Wishing you all a safe celebration today!

(Credit: NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory)

Super-hot Christmas hugs from our nearest star.

ikenbot:

Milky Way Shows 84 Million Stars in 9 Billion Pixels

Side Note: The two images shown above are mere crop outs from ESA’s recent hit: The 9 Billion Pixel Image of 84 Million Stars. These two focus on the bright center of the image for the purpose of highlighting what a peak at 84,000,000 stars looks like.

Astronomers at the European Southern Observatory’s Paranal Observatory in Chile have released a breathtaking new photograph showing the central area of our Milky Way galaxy. The photograph shows a whopping 84 million stars in an image measuring 108500×81500, which contains nearly 9 billion pixels.

It’s actually a composite of thousands of individual photographs shot with the observatory’s VISTA survey telescope, the same camera that captured the amazing 55-hour exposure. Three different infrared filters were used to capture the different details present in the final image.

The VISTA’s camera is sensitive to infrared light, which allows its vision to pierce through much of the space dust that blocks the view of ordinary optical telescope/camera systems.

source

(Source: kenobi-wan-obi)

n-a-s-a:

The Horsehead Nebula 
Credit & Copyright: Nigel Sharp (NOAO), KPNO, AURA, NSF

n-a-s-a:

The Horsehead Nebula

Credit & Copyright: Nigel Sharp (NOAO), KPNO, AURA, NSF

n-a-s-a:

Galaxies, Stars, and Dust 
Image Credit & Copyright: Ignacio de la Cueva Torregrosa

n-a-s-a:

Galaxies, Stars, and Dust

Image Credit & Copyright: Ignacio de la Cueva Torregrosa

cozydark:

The orbits of the moons and planets form a fractal 4-dimensional helix in spacetime.

(via infinity-imagined)